Fish and Wildlife Service

Title Due Date Maximum Award Amount Description
F23AS00018 - Sea Duck Joint Venture FY23 Competitive Grants $300,000.00

The Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV) is a conservation partnership under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP). Its mission is to promote the conservation of North American sea ducks by providing greater scientific knowledge and understanding of sea duck biology and ecology to support effective management. The SDJV is composed of Federal and state/provincial wildlife agencies in Canada and the U.S., as well as non-governmental organizations and other entities committed to sea duck conservation. SDJV projects are accomplished through efficient public/private partnerships and cooperative funding. The SDJV is coordinated and administered by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Canadian Wildlife Service. Primary funding is provided to the SDJV through U.S. Congressional appropriations; some of this funding is made available through competitive grants to solicit partnerships that can address priority science needs of the SDJV. This funding opportunity is made under the authority of Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956; 16 U.S.C. 742. SDJV funding supports both the USFWS and Department of Interior (DOI) missions, and the DOI Secretary’s priorities related to conservation stewardship and protection. One of the purposes of the SDJV is to prevent further listings of sea duck species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), as two sea duck populations are already listed as threatened in the U.S., and two are listed as species of concern under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) in Canada. Funded projects contribute sound science about sea duck populations and habitat needs that contribute to monitoring their status and addressing factors that diminish their abundance. Healthy sea duck populations support traditional harvests of sea ducks that are important for subsistence hunters in rural northern communities, and waterfowl hunting opportunities for hunters in the U.S. and Canada, particularly in coastal areas of the Atlantic, Great Lakes, and Pacific regions. In FY 2023, the SDJV will accept proposals for the following priority research needs stepped down from the broader focal areas identified in the SDJV Strategic Plan (available at http://seaduckjv.org). With this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO), there is greater interest on studies that apply at larger scales than on site-specific studies at non-randomly selected locations. SDJV is also interested in projects that include objectives focusing on engagement of Indigenous communities, outreach and communication, student support, and development of new partnerships. SDJV considers the following species high priority because of the magnitude of information needs of each given an assessment of available information and predicted current/future stressors: Common Eider, King Eider, Harlequin Duck, Surf Scoter, Long-tailed Duck, White-winged Scoter, Black Scoter, and Barrow’s Goldeneye. Funded projects can focus on other sea duck species if they fit the following priority research needs, but projects on high priority species are preferred. SDJV priority research needs for FY 2023 include: Information on migratory connectivity and habitat use of sea ducks to improve survey design, harvest management, and development of conservation actions. New studies could target geographic gaps from previous satellite telemetry studies or analyze existing datasets. Priorities include, but are not limited to, large-scale projects that provide information on population delineation (Pacific vs. Atlantic) for species where populations overlap, and projects focusing on priority sea duck species, particularly Long-tailed Ducks, western Harlequin Ducks, and King Eiders. Improve the quality of data and information on sea ducks by exploring alternative protocols, improved analytical methods, or new technology. Desired products include: (a) A review of current efforts, information and technological gaps, and suggestions for future research and efforts for aerial survey methods. This would require assembling and reviewing the current methods available to automate the counting and speciation of sea ducks in aerial photographs and remotely sensed imagery, and determining the similarities, differences, strength, weaknesses, and most likely paths forward for automated counts of birds. (b) A method to integrate high-definition aerial survey data being collected at offshore wind areas throughout the Atlantic coast with sea duck monitoring priorities. (c) The development of remote tracking techniques including tags, remote sensing, and other tools that have specific applications to our other priorities. (d) The collection and integration of Indigenous Knowledge to inform broad questions about sea duck ecology and management related to SDJV priorities. Studies focused on estimating rates of fecundity (e.g., estimating breeding propensity, nesting phenology, clutch size, nest success, and/or fledging success on the breeding areas, or determining fall or winter age and sex ratios to provide an index of annual productivity) and survival (all life stages, and including harvest) of priority sea duck species. Large-scale projects focused on investigating factors that influence these demographic parameters and provide information to inform harvest estimates and population-level management decisions will be prioritized. Projects that test capture methods, occur in new areas, and/or contribute to developing cost-effective, large-scale approaches may also be considered for short-term funding Identify and characterize ecological attributes of habitat used by priority sea duck species to determine critical dependencies and vulnerabilities to anthropogenic effects and climate change. Large-scale studies, and those focused on areas where increased development/human use is anticipated, will be prioritized. Desired products include, but are not limited to: (a) estimates of energetic demands or time activity budgets for molting or wintering sea ducks to inform future estimates of landscape carrying capacity, (b) habitat suitability models for priority sea duck species; (c) evaluation and prediction of the effects of climate change on sea ducks, including changes in northern breeding areas and coastal habitats, altered phenology of life history patterns, changes in food resources and predator landscapes, and other conditions that degrade or enhance productivity and survival, (d) evaluation of the effects of wind energy and other industrial and agricultural development on sea ducks, and (e) development and testing of potential methods to reduce negative effects of industrial or agricultural development on sea ducks. Improve our understanding of the viewpoints of various stakeholders in sea duck conservation. Desired products include, but are not limited to, estimates of the size and composition of fall/winter general hunting and spring/summer subsistence harvest, an assessment of the derivation and distribution of harvest, an assessment of the values and concerns of other stakeholders, including birdwatchers, the waterfowl management community, habitat joint ventures, and other groups, and the collection and integration of Indigenous Knowledge regarding historical and current subsistence use of sea ducks. Assess the effect of changing predator communities (e.g., bald eagle, polar bear, mink, fox) on sea duck foraging behavior, breeding success, diurnal and long-term distribution patterns, and the effects of potential distribution shifts on the interpretation of survey data from long-term monitoring studies. Interested applicants are strongly encouraged to contact the SDJV Coordinators and JV associates in advance of submitting proposals to ensure that they understand the specific nature of the issues and consider advice on previous scientific work. More information on the SDJV’s previous work, strategies, and priorities is outlined in plans, reports, and products archived at http://seaduckjv.org/.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=341404
F23AS00015 - NAWCA 2023 US Small Grants $100,000.00

The U.S. Small Grants Program is a competitive, matching grants program that supports public-private partnerships carrying out projects in the United States that further the goals of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. Projects must involve only long-term protection, restoration, enhancement and/or establishment of wetland and associated upland habitats to benefit migratory birds. The program requires a 1:1 non-federal match and research funding is ineligible. This program supports the DOI and FWS mission of protecting and managing the nation's natural resources by collaborating with partners and stakeholders to conserve land and water and to expand outdoor recreation and access.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=341350
F23AS00378 - FY 2023 - Sportfishing and Boating Safety Act - BIG Tier 2 $1,500,000.00

Recreational boating is a popular activity; there are approximately 11.8 million registered motor boats in the United States. Of this total, an estimated 584,000 are at least 26 feet long. The Sportfishing and Boating Safety Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-178)established the Boating Infrastructure Grants (BIG) Program (16 U.S.C. 777g-1) to provide funding to the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands, and the territories of Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands (States) for the construction, renovation and maintenance of boating infrastructure facilities for transient recreational vessels at least 26 feet long that are operated, leased, rented, or chartered primarily for pleasure. The Act amended the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 777). Subsequent reauthorizations of the Act allow expenditures from the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund and the continuation of the BIG Program. Boating infrastructure means the structures, equipment, accessories, and services that are necessary or desirable for a facility to accommodate eligible vessels. Transient vessels are those passing through or by a place, staying up to 15 days. Projects completed using BIG funds must provide public access, but may be publicly or privately owned. This package is the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 BIG Tier 2 National grants.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=341167
F23AS00377 - FY 2023 - Sportfishing and Boating Safety Act - BIG Tier 1 $200,000.00

Recreational boating is a popular activity; there are approximately 11.8 million registered motor boats in the United States. Of this total, an estimated 584,000 are at least 26 feet long. The Sportfishing and Boating Safety Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-178)established the Boating Infrastructure Grants (BIG) Program (16 U.S.C. 777g-1) to provide funding to the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands, and the territories of Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands (States) for the construction, renovation and maintenance of boating infrastructure facilities for transient recreational vessels at least 26 feet long that are operated, leased, rented, or chartered primarily for pleasure. The Act amended the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 777). Subsequent reauthorizations of the Act allow expenditures from the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund and the continuation of the BIG Program. Boating infrastructure means the structures, equipment, accessories, and services that are necessary or desirable for a facility to accommodate eligible vessels. Transient vessels are those passing through or by a place, staying up to 15 days. Projects completed using BIG funds must provide public access, but may be publicly or privately owned. This package is the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 BIG Tier 1 State grants.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=341151
F22AS00281 FY22 Endangered Species Conservation - Wolf Livestock Loss Compensation and Prevention Grants $450,000.00

Authority: Section 6202(a) of the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 (7 U.S.C. §426 note [Transferred]. Recodified as §8351 note) Assistance Listing Number: 15.666 Background, Purpose and Program Requirements: Subtitle C of the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009 (P.L. 111-11) authorized the Wolf Livestock Loss Demonstration Project (Program) with two purposes: 1) Prevention - Provide funding to assist livestock producers in undertaking proactive, nonlethal activities to reduce the risk of livestock loss due to predation by wolves; and 2) Compensation - Provide funding to reimburse livestock producers for livestock losses due to such predation. Federal financial assistance, provided in the form of grants, can be used to support the implementation of state and tribal programs designed to assist livestock producers in undertaking proactive, nonlethal activities to reduce the risk of livestock loss due to predation by wolves and to compensate livestock producers for livestock losses due to such predation. Included in the authorizing language is direction to award this Federal financial assistance through a competitive grant program and to expend funds equally between the program’s two purposes. Proactive, nonlethal preventive measures eligible for funding include, but are not limited to, fencing, livestock guard dogs, and range riders who patrol areas occupied by livestock susceptible to predation by wolves. Depredation Compensation funding may be used for the reimbursement of livestock losses due to confirmed wolf depredation. Qualifying livestock includes cattle, swine, horses, mules, sheep, goats and livestock guard animals. States and tribes (hereafter, applicants) may apply for Depredation Compensation funding for the reimbursement of livestock losses and/or a Depredation Prevention funding for preventative management activities that occur on Federal, state, or private land, or land owned by, or held in trust for the benefit of, a tribe. Grants are awarded directly to applicants. Applicants must establish their own procedures for accepting applications from private entities (including individual ranchers, for-profit corporations, and not-for-profit organizations) interested in obtaining Program funds. Those seeking funds will need to work through the procedures established by their state wildlife management/animal damage control agency. Applicants are eligible to compete for either Depredation Compensation or Depredation Prevention funding, or both. Applicants may submit a proposal that includes both activities but each activity will be ranked and considered separately.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=340933
F23AS00014 - NAWCA 2023 Canada Grants $10,000,000.00

The NAWCA Canada program promotes partnerships between public agencies and groups interested in: a) protecting, improving, restoring, and managing an appropriate distribution and diversity of wetland ecosystems and other habitats for wetlands-associated migratory birds and other fish and wildlife in North America; b) maintaining and improving the current distributions of wetlands-associated migratory bird populations; and c) maintaining an abundance of waterfowl (ducks, geese, and swans) and other populations of wetlands-associated migratory birds consistent with the objectives of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan, Waterbird Conservation Plan for the Americas, Partners in Flight Bird Conservation Plan, and other international obligations contained in the treaties and migratory bird conventions and other agreements with Canada, Mexico, and other countries. Proposals to the NAWCA Canada program should demonstrate how the activities of partners would encourage sustainable and effective programs for the long-term conservation of wetlands-associated migratory birds. NAWCA funds wetlands conservation projects that include: a) the acquisition of property containing wetlands ecosystems and associated habitats, including water rights, where the acquired land will be administered for its long-term conservation and for the benefit of migratory birds, fish, and other wildlife that depend on it; and/or b) restoration, enhancement, or management of wetlands ecosystems and associated habitats, where these activities will be conducted on lands and waters that will be administered for their long-term conservation and for the benefit of migratory birds, fish, and other wildlife that depend on them. NAWCA Canada proposals contribute to efforts to reduce climate pollution, support climate resilience, support land conservation and biodiversity efforts and leverage partnerships.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=340844
F22AS00368 Science & Implementation Support in the Southeast $500,000.00

The Service is the primary fish and wildlife conservation agency within the Executive Branch of the U.S. government, tasked with a diverse array of responsibilities related to conservation and societal valuation of public trust resources. The Migratory Bird and Science Applications programs of the Southeast Fish & Wildlife Service seek to maximize the conservation of birds and other trust resources by jointly working to maintain bird populations at prescribed levels, provide leadership in conservation and management of trust species and their habitats, manage data and information for use in decision making, and ensure the meaningful inclusion of multiple partners and stakeholders in landscape-scale planning and implementation of conservation actions

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=340814
F22AS00373 - FY2022 Implementation of the Quagga and Zebra Mussel Action Plan (QZAP) in the Western United States $600,000.00

Quagga and Zebra Mussels are aquatic invasive species that are rapidly expanding their range in the Western United States. Popular recreational reservoirs on or connected to the lower Colorado River are one major source of invasive mussels, which are easily transported via trailered watercraft to areas that have not yet been invaded. This Request For Proposals (RFP) will fund proposals in the listed principal areas towards the fulfillment of the top priorities in the Quagga/Zebra Mussel Action Plan for Western U.S. Waters (QZAP) and will be limited to states within the boundaries of the Western Regional Panel within the United States, not including Canada and Mexico (see map): https://westernregionalpanel.org/about-us/ Limiting the spread of invasive mussels through containment, especially by inspection and decontamination of watercraft moving from invaded water bodies to jurisdictions currently free of dreissenid mussels, and the coordination between states or other jurisdictions to this end; Protecting western ecosystems through support and/or establishment of prevention programs for invasive mussels at identified high risk control points. Limiting the spread of invasive mussels through containment by increasing compliance with federal, state, local and tribal laws; Increasing the effectiveness of outreach and education efforts to help advance prevention efforts; Building capacity to detect and respond to new invasive mussel infestations; Conducting Research that benefits the priorities listed above, including (but not limited to) social science research to evaluate the effectiveness of invasive species prevention messaging, and research on non-target species impacts of invasive mussel control treatments. Efforts to address the risks and impacts of these invasive species are on-going. They include development of QZAP, and funding by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (Service) to address waters at highest risk for spreading invasive mussels. In fiscal year 2022 the Service plans to allocate approximately $2,250,000 to projects that will reduce or minimize the threat of quagga and zebra mussels to Western U.S. waters. Funding is available for a limited number of projects that target containment of quagga or zebra mussels in areas already infested, e.g., the lower Colorado River and connected waters, by minimizing the potential for trailered boats to carry invasive mussels to other waters, through actions that meet the principle areas identified above.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=340550
Seaplane Invasive Species Risk Analysis-Phase II $80,000.00

The ANS Task Force, within its Strategic Plan for 2020-2025 (Objective 2.2 and 2.3), identifies a need to evaluate and prioritize pathways, develop risk management strategies, and encourage implementation of non-regulatory and regulatory measures to prevent the establishment and spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in waters of the United States. While evaluating pathways, the ANS Task Force determined that more information is needed to assess the risk of spreading AIS via the seaplane pathway and develop measures to mitigate this risk. This project will address these objectives. Air travel has historically connected otherwise isolated areas, providing a means to transport species from one location to another. The risk of species movement associated with commercial airplanes and air cargo carriers has been previously evaluated (e.g., Tatem, AJ. 2009. Ecography 32:99-102); however, the ANS Task Force Prevention Subcommittee found that information on the potential risks associated with seaplanes is currently lacking. Seaplanes may be a more direct risk to aquatic habitats, as opposed to passenger or cargo aircraft. For example, studies of the seaplane transportation pathway in Alaska have concluded that seaplanes have contributed to the spread of Elodea, an invasive aquatic plant within Alaska (Schwoerer, T. 2017. Doctoral Dissertation. University of Alaska, Fairbanks). The spread of Elodea could have significant economic impacts on fisheries, businesses, and recreation if left unchecked. Currently, the significance of the seaplane pathway as a vector for high-risk species, such as Dreissenid mussels, within the contiguous United States, and between Alaska and the contiguous United States is poorly understood. The Service, co-chair of the ANS Task Force, requests proposals to build upon previous studies and evaluate the risk of the seaplane pathway as a vector for AIS. This risk analysis includes two components: a risk assessment and identification of risk management actions. Phase I of the assessment is in progress to identify the range of waterbodies utilized by seaplanes, seaplane travel patterns, structural and operation risk factors related to seaplanes, and measures taken by seaplane operators to prevent the transport of AIS. Phase II of the assessment (this announcement) will conduct a risk assessment on AIS transported through the seaplane pathway and identify risk management actions to reduce the spread of AIS. Once available, the selected applicant will be provided with information from Phase I to help inform the work of Phase II. (See Supporting Document [Phase I Report Outline]; work in progress. Phase I data is expected to be available beginning in November 2022.) Information from Phase I, along with information collected by the applicant on AIS transported by seaplanes, will be used by the applicant to conduct a risk assessment, and identify risk management actions that can be taken by seaplane operators, manufacturers, and others to reduce the spread of AIS. The assessment should be conducted for the 48 contiguous states and Alaska. Your risk analysis proposal must address: Identifying what AIS potentially could be moved by seaplane operation. Identifying operational or distribution practices and behaviors that may facilitate transport of AIS. Assessing the effectiveness of measures taken by seaplane operators to prevent the transport of AIS. Developing evidence-based recommendations for preventing the establishment and spread of AIS through seaplane operation and distribution, working with seaplane pilots to ensure the recommendations are realistic and practical. Developing evidence-based recommendations for preventing the spread of AIS through seaplane manufacturing to consider possible redesign opportunities if high-risk areas of the plane are identified. It is the intent that the results of this assessment may be used by the ANS Task Force, regional ANS panels, States, and partners to develop or enhance seaplane decontamination and inspection protocols or other industry standards, processes, or programs. Risk management strategies may also inform State and non-governmental educational and awareness campaigns that inform seaplane pilots about the risks of AIS and encourage preventative behaviors to reduce this risk. Proposals submitted for this award should address how the anticipated results will assist the ANS Task Force in reaching the goal of preventing the establishment and spread of AIS by seaplanes through non-regulatory and regulatory measures. Following the assessment, the ANS Task Force will work with federal and state agency personnel and others who are actively involved with seaplane operation, seaplane manufacturing or distribution, and AIS management to facilitate adoption of the recommendations, as appropriate. Following award selection, and prior to commencement of work, the successful applicant must meet with the Service either virtually or in person. During the meeting, the applicant will summarize the work plan (methods and timetable) and review the draft outline of the final report, included in the application, with the Service. The Service will provide feedback on anticipated deliverables meeting ANS Task Force needs. Thereafter, quarterly calls to discuss progress will be required. Overall, the final report should: Summarize pertinent information from Phase I that is used as the basis for the risk management recommendations in Phase II. Identify and quantify the risk of spreading AIS though seaplane operation, including potential high-risk AIS that may be transported through this pathway. Identify any specific operational practices or behaviors of seaplane operators, manufacturers and distributers that may facilitate transport of AIS. Recommend priority best management practices to reduce the risk of AIS spread by seaplanes. Recommend possible redesign opportunities or industry standards that could be considered by seaplane manufactures to reduce the spread of AIS. Once the risk analysis is complete, the grantee will be required to present (30 – 45 minutes, in person or virtually) the findings and recommendations to the Service and ANS Task Force, along with their final risk analysis report.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=340531
F22AS00359 Migratory Bird Joint Ventures: 2022 Arctic Goose Joint Venture Notice of Funding Opportunity $150,000.00

The Arctic Goose Joint Venture (AGJV) is a partnership-based program under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) that provides and improves scientific information to support and promote effective management, monitoring, and conservation of northern-nesting geese. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), a partner in the AGJV, administers financial assistance awards (grants and cooperative agreements) on a competitive basis for projects and studies that advance the general scientific community's understanding of goose ecology and management and is seeking proposals from interested parties.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=340495