Advanced Research Projects Agency Energy

Title Due Date Maximum Award Amount Description
RFI:Technology Advancements for Subsurface Exploration for Renewable Energy Resources or Carbon Storage Varies

RFI: Technology Advancements for Subsurface Exploration for Renewable Energy Resources or Carbon Storage This is a Request for Information (RFI) only. This RFI is not soliciting application for financial assistance. The purpose of this RFI is solely to solicit input for ARPA-E consideration to inform the possible formulation of future programs. The purpose of this RFI is to solicit input for a potential future ARPA-E research program focused on technologies that enable high-resolution, wide-area subsurface mapping in order to identify opportunities for renewable energy technologies and the future low-carbon economy. Examples where advances in subsurface imaging will be critical include, but are not limited to, locating reservoirs for carbon capture and storage (CCS), identifying new geothermal sites, mapping natural accumulations of energy-relevant minerals, and assessing potential resources of geologic hydrogen. The goal is to better understand how subsurface imaging technologies today may need to expand, adapt, or improve beyond technologies which have been optimized for oil and gas exploration. ARPA-E is seeking information at this time regarding the state of the art in subsurface imaging technologies and transformative and implementable technologies that could: 1. Reduce frontier exploration costs for renewable energy or carbon storage projects by an order of magnitude or more, leveraging advancements in subsurface imaging, data collection, and data processing. For new renewable technologies or CCS projects, identifying potential geologic sites with the requisite properties requires honing in on sites from a much larger region, often in areas that have not been traditionally explored by oil and gas interests and where there is little prior high-quality imaging data. Isolating regions of interest could mean developing new, cost-effective wide-area subsurface exploration technologies, using a combination of imaging techniques paired with multi-physics models, using data processing or novel geostatistical methods to upgrade or augment existing datasets, and/or developing machine learning algorithms which can fill in data gaps. 2. Advance data processing to accommodate larger amounts of data and reduce processing time by orders of magnitude for wide-area and/or nationwide subsurface imaging surveys. 3. Dramatically improve project success rates. Successful technologies would result in outcomes such as reduced incidence of dry wells in geothermal energy projects or identification of new energy-relevant mineral deposits. These outcomes can be facilitated by acquiring higher-quality and/or more comprehensive data in order to discern sites with high probability factors. 4. Monitor dynamic changes in the subsurface over time (4D mapping) with more sensitive surveys techniques, more comprehensive models, and/or algorithms. ARPA-E expects that subsurface changes of interest to renewable energy or CCS projects (e.g. changes in rock morphology, active water-rock chemical reactions, fluid migration, fracture network development, biological processes) may be different than those typically modelled for the oil and gas industry and that current models may need to be expanded to include these processes. 5. Reveal opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration, combining the expertise of groups that traditionally do not interact, in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of dynamic geologic processes. To view the RFI in its entirety, please visit https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. The information you provide may be used by ARPA-E in support of program planning. THIS IS A REQUEST FOR INFORMATION ONLY. THIS NOTICE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT (FOA). NO FOA EXISTS AT THIS TIME.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=336236
RFI: Engineered Strategies for Net-Negative Emissions Pathways via Enhanced Terrestrial Ecosystems Varies

Request for Information (RFI): Engineered Strategies for Net-Negative Emissions Pathways via Enhanced Terrestrial Ecosystems This is a Request for Information (RFI) only. This RFI is not soliciting application for financial assistance. The purpose of this RFI is solely to solicit input for ARPA-E consideration to inform the possible formulation of future programs. The purpose of this RFI is solely to solicit input for ARPA-E consideration to inform the possible formulation of future research programs. ARPA-E will not provide funding or compensation for any information submitted in response to this RFI, and ARPA-E may use information submitted to this RFI without any attribution to the source. This RFI provides the broad research community with an opportunity to contribute views and opinions. ARPA-E is seeking insight into both parallel and exclusive approaches to terrestrial carbon removal and sequestration, including, but not limited to, approaches that employ recent advancements in biological, geochemical, or hybrid technologies. Additionally, ARPA-E is requesting information on how agriculture systems and feedstock crops may be engineered and bred to better feed into economically viable BECCS pathways for large-scale, near-term carbon removal opportunities. To view the RFI in its entirety, please visit https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. The information you provide may be used by ARPA-E in support of program planning. THIS IS A REQUEST FOR INFORMATION ONLY. THIS NOTICE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT (FOA). NO FOA EXISTS AT THIS TIME.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=335597
Reducing Emissions of Methane Every Day of the Year (REMEDY) $5,000,000.00

Reducing Emissions of Methane Every Day of the Year (REMEDY) Methane Emissions Abatement Program To obtain a copy of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) please go to the ARPA-E website at https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. To apply to this FOA, Applicants must register with and submit application materials through ARPA-E eXCHANGE (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Registration.aspx). For detailed guidance on using ARPA-E eXCHANGE, please refer to the ARPA-E eXCHANGE User Guide (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Manuals.aspx). ARPA-E will not review or consider concept papers submitted through other means. For problems with ARPA-E eXCHANGE, email ExchangeHelp@hq.doe.gov (with FOA name and number in the subject line). Questions about this FOA? Check the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://arpa-e.energy.gov/faq. For questions that have not already been answered, email ARPA-E-CO@hq.doe.gov. Agency Overview: The Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E), an organization within the Department of Energy (DOE), is chartered by Congress in the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-69), as amended by the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-358), as further amended by the Energy Act of 2020 (P.L. 116-260) to: “(A) to enhance the economic and energy security of the United States through the development of energy technologies that— (i) reduce imports of energy from foreign sources; (ii) reduce energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases; (iii) improve the energy efficiency of all economic sectors; (iv) provide transformative solutions to improve the management, clean-up, and disposal of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel; and (v) improve the resilience, reliability, and security of infrastructure to produce, deliver, and store energy; and (B) to ensure that the United States maintains a technological lead in developing and deploying advanced energy technologies.” ARPA-E issues this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) under its authorizing statute codified at 42 U.S.C. § 16538. The FOA and any awards made under this FOA are subject to 2 C.F.R. Part 200 as supplemented by 2 C.F.R. Part 910. ARPA-E funds research on and the development of transformative science and technology solutions to address the energy and environmental missions of the Department. The agency focuses on technologies that can be meaningfully advanced with a modest investment over a defined period of time in order to catalyze the translation from scientific discovery to early-stage technology. For the latest news and information about ARPA-E, its programs and the research projects currently supported, see: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/. ARPA-E funds transformational research. Existing energy technologies generally progress on established “learning curves” where refinements to a technology and the economies of scale that accrue as manufacturing and distribution develop drive down the cost/performance metric in a gradual fashion. This continual improvement of a technology is important to its increased commercial deployment and is appropriately the focus of the private sector or the applied technology offices within DOE. By contrast, ARPA-E supports transformative research that has the potential to create fundamentally new learning curves. ARPA-E technology projects typically start with cost/performance estimates well above the level of an incumbent technology. Given the high risk inherent in these projects, many will fail to progress, but some may succeed in generating a new learning curve with a projected cost/performance metric that is significantly lower than that of the incumbent technology. ARPA-E funds technology with the potential to be disruptive in the marketplace. The mere creation of a new learning curve does not ensure market penetration. Rather, the ultimate value of a technology is determined by the marketplace, and impactful technologies ultimately become disruptive – that is, they are widely adopted and displace existing technologies from the marketplace or create entirely new markets. ARPA-E understands that definitive proof of market disruption takes time, particularly for energy technologies. Therefore, ARPA-E funds the development of technologies that, if technically successful, have clear disruptive potential, e.g., by demonstrating capability for manufacturing at competitive cost and deployment at scale. ARPA-E funds applied research and development. The Office of Management and Budget defines “applied research” as an “original investigation undertaken in order to acquire new knowledge…directed primarily towards a specific practical aim or objective” and defines “experimental development” as “creative and systematic work, drawing on knowledge gained from research and practical experience, which is directed at producing new products or processes or improving existing products or processes.”http://science.energy.gov/). Office of Science national scientific user facilities (http://science.energy.gov/user-facilities/) are open to all researchers, including ARPA-E Applicants and awardees. These facilities provide advanced tools of modern science including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld, the environment, and the atmosphere. Projects focused on early-stage R&D for the improvement of technology along defined roadmaps may be more appropriate for support through the DOE applied energy offices including: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (http://www.eere.energy.gov/), the Office of Fossil Energy (http://fossil.energy.gov/), the Office of Nuclear Energy (http://www.energy.gov/ne/office-nuclear-energy), and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (http://energy.gov/oe/office-electricity-delivery-and-energy-reliability). Applicants interested in receiving financial assistance for basic research (defined by the Office of Management and Budget as “experimental or theoretical work undertaken primarily to acquire new knowledge of the underlying foundations of phenomena and observable facts”) should contact the DOE’s Office of Science (http://science.energy.gov/). Office of Science national scientific user facilities (http://science.energy.gov/user-facilities/) are open to all researchers, including ARPA-E Applicants and awardees. These facilities provide advanced tools of modern science including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld, the environment, and the atmosphere. Projects focused on early-stage R&D for the improvement of technology along defined roadmaps may be more appropriate for support through the DOE applied energy offices including: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (http://www.eere.energy.gov/), the Office of Fossil Energy (http://fossil.energy.gov/), the Office of Nuclear Energy (http://www.energy.gov/ne/office-nuclear-energy), and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (http://energy.gov/oe/office-electricity-delivery-and-energy-reliability). Program Overview: REMEDY (Reducing Emissions of Methane Every day of the Year) is a 3-year, $35MM research program to reduce methane emissions from three sources in the oil, gas, and coal value chain. The goal is to reverse the rate of accumulation of methane in the atmosphere, decrease atmospheric methane concentration, and thus ameliorate climate change. The target sources are: - Exhaust from natural gas-fired lean-burn engines, used to drive compressors, generate electricity, and increasingly, repower ships; - Flares required for safe operation of oil and gas facilities; and - Coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM) exhausted from operating underground mines. These sources are responsible for at least 10% of US anthropogenic methane emissions. The REMEDY program seeks highly replicable system-level technical solutions that achieve an overall methane conversion of 99.5%, reduce net greenhouse gas emissions > 87% on a life-cycle basis, have a levelized cost of carbon less than $40/ton CO2e, and address techno-economic issues related to commercialization. Systems must incorporate technologies that can operate at lean- and ultra-lean methane concentrations integrated with sensors and/or control algorithms to quantify emission reduction and ensure consistent operation. Stage 1 of the program will be used to screen concepts, and projects selected to continue in Stage 2 will confirm metrics in a limited field test or larger, extended-lab-scale test. The REMEDY program addresses methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, and complements programs focused on CO2 reduction. REMEDY metrics will facilitate comparison of methane reduction processes with CO2 reduction processes.3,4 REMEDY augments and extends but will not duplicate existing initiatives focused on methane reduction, such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Natural Gas Star program and Coalbed Methane Outreach Program (CMOP), the DOE Fossil Energy Flare Reduction program, and the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative. Recovery or conversion to high-value products is allowed, provided techno-economic and environmental metrics are met. To read this FOA in its entirety, please go to the ARPA-E website at https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. Questions about this FOA? Check the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://arpa-e.energy.gov/faq. For questions that have not already been answered, email ARPA-E-CO@hq.doe.gov.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=332738
Reducing Emissions of Methane Every Day of the Year (REMEDY)(SBIR/STTR) $3,721,115.00

Reducing Emissions of Methane Every Day of the Year (REMEDY)(SBIR/STTR) To obtain a copy of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) please go to the ARPA-E website at https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. To apply to this FOA, Applicants must register with and submit application materials through ARPA-E eXCHANGE (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Registration.aspx). For detailed guidance on using ARPA-E eXCHANGE, please refer to the ARPA-E eXCHANGE User Guide (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Manuals.aspx). ARPA-E will not review or consider concept papers submitted through other means. For problems with ARPA-E eXCHANGE, email ExchangeHelp@hq.doe.gov (with FOA name and number in the subject line). Questions about this FOA? Check the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://arpa-e.energy.gov/faq. For questions that have not already been answered, email ARPA-E-CO@hq.doe.gov. Agency Overview: The Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E), an organization within the Department of Energy (DOE), is chartered by Congress in the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-69), as amended by the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-358), as further amended by the Energy Act of 2020 (P.L. 116-260) to: “(A) to enhance the economic and energy security of the United States through the development of energy technologies that— (i) reduce imports of energy from foreign sources; (ii) reduce energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases; (iii) improve the energy efficiency of all economic sectors; (iv) provide transformative solutions to improve the management, clean-up, and disposal of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel; and (v) improve the resilience, reliability, and security of infrastructure to produce, deliver, and store energy; and (B) to ensure that the United States maintains a technological lead in developing and deploying advanced energy technologies.” ARPA-E issues this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) under its authorizing statute codified at 42 U.S.C. § 16538. The FOA and any awards made under this FOA are subject to 2 C.F.R. Part 200 as supplemented by 2 C.F.R. Part 910. ARPA-E funds research on and the development of transformative science and technology solutions to address the energy and environmental missions of the Department. The agency focuses on technologies that can be meaningfully advanced with a modest investment over a defined period of time in order to catalyze the translation from scientific discovery to early-stage technology. For the latest news and information about ARPA-E, its programs and the research projects currently supported, see: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/. ARPA-E funds transformational research. Existing energy technologies generally progress on established “learning curves” where refinements to a technology and the economies of scale that accrue as manufacturing and distribution develop drive down the cost/performance metric in a gradual fashion. This continual improvement of a technology is important to its increased commercial deployment and is appropriately the focus of the private sector or the applied technology offices within DOE. By contrast, ARPA-E supports transformative research that has the potential to create fundamentally new learning curves. ARPA-E technology projects typically start with cost/performance estimates well above the level of an incumbent technology. Given the high risk inherent in these projects, many will fail to progress, but some may succeed in generating a new learning curve with a projected cost/performance metric that is significantly lower than that of the incumbent technology. ARPA-E funds technology with the potential to be disruptive in the marketplace. The mere creation of a new learning curve does not ensure market penetration. Rather, the ultimate value of a technology is determined by the marketplace, and impactful technologies ultimately become disruptive – that is, they are widely adopted and displace existing technologies from the marketplace or create entirely new markets. ARPA-E understands that definitive proof of market disruption takes time, particularly for energy technologies. Therefore, ARPA-E funds the development of technologies that, if technically successful, have clear disruptive potential, e.g., by demonstrating capability for manufacturing at competitive cost and deployment at scale. ARPA-E funds applied research and development. The Office of Management and Budget defines “applied research” as an “original investigation undertaken in order to acquire new knowledge…directed primarily towards a specific practical aim or objective” and defines “experimental development” as “creative and systematic work, drawing on knowledge gained from research and practical experience, which is directed at producing new products or processes or improving existing products or processes.”http://science.energy.gov/). Office of Science national scientific user facilities (http://science.energy.gov/user-facilities/) are open to all researchers, including ARPA-E Applicants and awardees. These facilities provide advanced tools of modern science including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld, the environment, and the atmosphere. Projects focused on early-stage R&D for the improvement of technology along defined roadmaps may be more appropriate for support through the DOE applied energy offices including: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (http://www.eere.energy.gov/), the Office of Fossil Energy (http://fossil.energy.gov/), the Office of Nuclear Energy (http://www.energy.gov/ne/office-nuclear-energy), and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (http://energy.gov/oe/office-electricity-delivery-and-energy-reliability). Applicants interested in receiving financial assistance for basic research (defined by the Office of Management and Budget as “experimental or theoretical work undertaken primarily to acquire new knowledge of the underlying foundations of phenomena and observable facts”) should contact the DOE’s Office of Science (http://science.energy.gov/). Office of Science national scientific user facilities (http://science.energy.gov/user-facilities/) are open to all researchers, including ARPA-E Applicants and awardees. These facilities provide advanced tools of modern science including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld, the environment, and the atmosphere. Projects focused on early-stage R&D for the improvement of technology along defined roadmaps may be more appropriate for support through the DOE applied energy offices including: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (http://www.eere.energy.gov/), the Office of Fossil Energy (http://fossil.energy.gov/), the Office of Nuclear Energy (http://www.energy.gov/ne/office-nuclear-energy), and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (http://energy.gov/oe/office-electricity-delivery-and-energy-reliability). Program Overview: REMEDY (Reducing Emissions of Methane Every day of the Year) is a 3-year, $35MM research program to reduce methane emissions from three sources in the oil, gas, and coal value chain. The goal is to reverse the rate of accumulation of methane in the atmosphere, decrease atmospheric methane concentration, and thus ameliorate climate change. The target sources are: - Exhaust from natural gas-fired lean-burn engines, used to drive compressors, generate electricity, and increasingly, repower ships; - Flares required for safe operation of oil and gas facilities; and - Coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM) exhausted from operating underground mines. These sources are responsible for at least 10% of US anthropogenic methane emissions. The REMEDY program seeks highly replicable system-level technical solutions that achieve an overall methane conversion of 99.5%, reduce net greenhouse gas emissions > 87% on a life-cycle basis, have a levelized cost of carbon less than $40/ton CO2e, and address techno-economic issues related to commercialization. Systems must incorporate technologies that can operate at lean- and ultra-lean methane concentrations integrated with sensors and/or control algorithms to quantify emission reduction and ensure consistent operation. Stage 1 of the program will be used to screen concepts, and projects selected to continue in Stage 2 will confirm metrics in a limited field test or larger, extended-lab-scale test. The REMEDY program addresses methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, and complements programs focused on CO2 reduction. REMEDY metrics will facilitate comparison of methane reduction processes with CO2 reduction processes.3,4 REMEDY augments and extends but will not duplicate existing initiatives focused on methane reduction, such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Natural Gas Star program and Coalbed Methane Outreach Program (CMOP), the DOE Fossil Energy Flare Reduction program, and the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative. Recovery or conversion to high-value products is allowed, provided techno-economic and environmental metrics are met. To read this FOA in its entirety, please go to the ARPA-E website at https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. Questions about this FOA? Check the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://arpa-e.energy.gov/faq. For questions that have not already been answered, email ARPA-E-CO@hq.doe.gov.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=332739
RFI on Manufacturing Carbon Negative Materials to Reduce Embodied Emissions in Buildings Varies

Request for Information (RFI): Manufacturing Carbon Negative Materials to Reduce Embodied Emissions in Buildings This is a Request for Information (RFI) only. This RFI is not soliciting application for financial assistance. The purpose of this RFI is solely to solicit input for ARPA-E consideration to inform the possible formulation of future programs. The purpose of this RFI is to solicit input for a potential future ARPA-E research program focused on technologies that could enable buildings to be transformed into carbon sinks to reduce their embodied emissions while also providing a pathway for expanding carbon utilization approaches. This vision entails manufacturing novel materials derived from feedstocks including forestry and other purpose-grown raw materials, agricultural residues, as well as direct use of greenhouse gases (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane). The aim is to use these materials in place of existing building construction materials wherever possible, as well as to enable more efficient building designs. Attaining this vision requires a radical departure from the use of modern building materials, and likely from the conventional manufacturing methods for building materials. At the same time, operational energy performance and the structural and fireproof code requirements of the buildings themselves must not be sacrificed. Comprehensive and robust life-cycle analyses and carbon accounting, along with permanency of storage and end-of-life design, will also be necessary. For these reasons, ARPA-E is especially interested in perspectives from both inside and outside the buildings sector community. Many of today’s buildings consist of steel, concrete, stone, brick and masonry materials. Their continued use is challenged by the energy intensive nature of their processing and manufacture. These manufacturing approaches can be particularly difficult to decarbonize. Wood, another common construction material, has seen a resurgence in interest with engineered woods and mass timber opening new possibilities due, in part, to their ability to store carbon. Land usage, transportation, and environmental impacts of adhesives used in engineered wood and mass timber production must be considered, however, for widespread adoption and to offset associated emissions. Additional pathways for increasing carbon storage content of the building stock, as well as exploring alternative materials with additional drawdown capabilities using greenhouse gas-based feedstocks will require advancements in materials and processing-to-scale. The nascency of these alternative materials pose an additional challenge for implementation in the risk-averse construction industry. To view the RFI in its entirety, please visit https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. The information you provide may be used by ARPA-E in support of program planning. THIS IS A REQUEST FOR INFORMATION ONLY. THIS NOTICE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT (FOA). NO FOA EXISTS AT THIS TIME.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=332387
ARPA-E AND ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION PARTNERSHIP 2.0 $2,000,000.00

ARPA-E supports high-potential, high-impact energy technologies that are too early for private-sector research investment. For its part, ESTCP demonstrates and validates promising technologies that target DoD’s urgent environmental and installation energy needs and are projected to pay back the capital investment through cost savings, improved efficiencies, or other improved outcomes. The complementary nature of these missions has led to this partnership to demonstrate ARPA-E supported technologies at DoD installations, with ARPA-E providing technologies and funding and ESTCP providing access to DoD’s installations and expertise in conducting demonstration projects. The projects funded by this FOA will respond to high priority DoD installation energy technology requirements and the need to improve Defense readiness by reducing facilities’ operation and maintenance costs and improving energy security. The goal is to conduct demonstrations to validate the performance and operational costs of promising energy efficiency and security technologies; to provide any data needed for end-user acceptance; and, to accelerate the commercialization of the technology. These demonstrations will be conducted under operational conditions at DoD facilities or locations for which DoD holds responsibility. Candidate technologies are expected to have successfully completed laboratory testing and, when applicable, initial small-scale field testing. The demonstrations are intended to generate supporting cost and performance data for acceptance or validation of the technology. As appropriate, these projects should also support the future implementation of the tested technology through the development of appropriate guidance, design, and/or protocol documents. This program will not support full-scale demonstrations that are primarily intended to solve an individual installation’s problem; priority will be given to those projects that address multi-Service or DoD-wide requirements. These projects must: 1. Execute the technology demonstration to validate the technology’s performance and expected operational costs: • Each project must develop Pre-Demonstration and Demonstration Plan, to govern the technical execution and management of the demonstration. Guidance describing the requirements of the Demonstration Plans can be found on the ESTCP website (https://www.serdp-estcp.org/Investigator-Resources/ESTCP-Resources/Demo…). The Demonstration Plans must be reviewed and approved by ARPA-E prior to beginning any work at the installation. • Each project is expected to generate sufficient pertinent and high quality data to scientifically validate all claims made for that technology.• Cost and performance data will be collected and shared with ARPA-E and DoD during and after the demonstration(s) to allow realistic estimates to be derived for full-scale implementation of the technology at the demonstration site and other DoD sites.2. Transition the technology:• Develop a Technology Transition Plan and submit it to ARPA-E for approval. Guidance on the Technology Transition plan can be found on the ESTCP website. (https://www.serdp-estcp.org/Investigator-Resources/ESTCP-Resources/Demo…)• Identify and work with the intended DoD user community to achieve their acceptance and feedback on the usefulness of the technology.• Publish appropriate user guidance, design, and/or protocol documents to assist the future implementation of the technology.• Publish a Final Report that will be publicly available and contain the demonstration test data. • Publish the results of the demonstration in the scientific peer reviewed literature and present results at technical conferences, as appropriate.• Identify pathways to implementation of the technology. 3. Provide data and support to achieve regulatory and end-user acceptance:• Technologies needing regulatory approval for use will be required to engage the regulatory community at the outset of project execution. Feedback from regulators must be solicited and incorporated into the project’s Demonstration Plans. • No single approach for working with the regulatory community is prescribed by the program. Interaction with individual state regulatory organizations, interstate groups, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as needed, is encouraged. The approach taken should be appropriate for the technology being demonstrated and the regulatory issues associated with implementing the technology. Applicants selected for demonstration will be teamed with a DoD liaison who will be responsible for assisting in selecting the demonstration site, validating the technology’s cost and performance, interfacing with the regulatory and user community, and supporting the transfer of the technology across DoD.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=332124
OPEN 2021 $10,000,000.00

DE-FOA-0002459 (OPEN 2021)To obtain a copy of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) please go to the ARPA-E website at https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. To apply to this FOA, Applicants must register with and submit application materials through ARPA-E eXCHANGE (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Registration.aspx). For detailed guidance on using ARPA-E eXCHANGE, please refer to the ARPA-E eXCHANGE User Guide (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Manuals.aspx). ARPA-E will not review or consider concept papers submitted through other means. For problems with ARPA-E eXCHANGE, email ExchangeHelp@hq.doe.gov (with FOA name and number in the subject line).Questions about this FOA? Check the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://arpa-e.energy.gov/faq. For questions that have not already been answered, email ARPA-E-CO@hq.doe.gov. The Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E), an organization within the Department of Energy (DOE), is chartered by Congress in the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-69), as amended by the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-358) to:“(A) to enhance the economic and energy security of the United States through the development of energy technologies that result in—(i) reductions of imports of energy from foreign sources;(ii) reductions of energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases; and(iii) improvement in the energy efficiency of all economic sectors; and(B) to ensure that the United States maintains a technological lead in developing and deploying advanced energy technologies. ”ARPA-E issues this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) under its authorizing statute codified at 42 U.S.C. § 16538. The FOA and any awards made under this FOA are subject to 2 C.F.R. Part 200 as supplemented by 2 C.F.R. Part 910. ARPA-E funds research on and the development of high-potential, high-impact energy technologies that are too early for private-sector investment. The agency focuses on technologies that can be meaningfully advanced with a modest investment over a defined period of time in order to catalyze the translation from scientific discovery to early-stage technology. For the latest news and information about ARPA-E, its programs and the research projects currently supported, see: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/.This FOA marks the fifth OPEN solicitation in the history of ARPA-E. The previous OPEN solicitations were conducted at the inception of the agency in 2009 and again in 2012, 2015, and 2018. OPEN 2021 therefore continues the three-year periodic cycle for ARPA-E OPEN solicitations. An OPEN solicitation provides a vitally important mechanism for the support of innovative energy R&D that complements ARPA-E’s primary mechanism, which is through the solicitation of research projects in focused technology programs. ARPA-E’s focused programs target specific areas of technology that the agency has identified, through extensive interaction with the appropriate external stakeholders, as having significant potential impact on one or more of the Mission Areas described in Section I.A of the FOA. Awards made in response to the solicitation for focused programs support the aggressive technical targets established in that solicitation. Taken in total, ARPA-E’s focused technology programs cover a significant portion of the spectrum of energy technologies and applications. ARPA-E’s OPEN FOAs ensure that the agency does not miss opportunities to support innovative energy R&D that falls outside of the topics of the focused technology programs or that develop after focused solicitations have closed. OPEN FOAs provide the agency with a broad sampling of new and emerging opportunities across the complete spectrum of energy applications and allow the agency to “take the pulse” of the energy R&D community. OPEN FOAs have been and will continue to be the complement to the agency’s focused technology programs – a unique combination of approaches for supporting the most innovative and current energy technology R&D. For instance, one-third of the sixty examples of most successful ARPA-E projects featured in ARPA-E Impact volumes (https://arpa-e.energy.gov/about/our-impact) resulted from OPEN solicitations. Potential applicants to this FOA are strongly encouraged to examine the OPEN projects in these volumes and all of the projects supported in the previous four OPEN solicitations (https://arpa-e.energy.gov/technologies/open-programs) for examples of the creative and innovative R&D ARPA-E seeks in its OPEN solicitations. The objective of an ARPA-E OPEN FOA is simple, yet comprehensive: to support high-risk R&D leading to the development of potentially disruptive new technologies across the full spectrum of energy applications. ARPA-E seeks to support early-stage, but potentially transformational research, in all areas of energy R&D, covering transportation and stationary applications. Areas of research responsive to this FOA include (but are not limited to) electricity generation by both conventional and renewable means; electricity transmission, storage, and distribution; energy efficiency for buildings, manufacturing and commerce, and personal use; and all aspects of transportation, including the production and distribution of both renewable and non-renewable fuels, electrification, and energy efficiency in transportation. Because of the enormous breadth of energy technologies solicited under an OPEN FOA, the well-defined technical targets in a focused ARPA-E technology program FOA are inapplicable. Rather, ARPA-E asks applicants to address the potential impact of the proposed technology on the agency’s Mission Areas: reducing imported energy, reducing energy-related emissions, and improving energy efficiency. The critical question for applicants to consider in assessing potential impact is: “If it works, will it matter?” In a FOA for a focused technology program, this question has already been answered by ARPA-E. If an applicant can demonstrate that the proposed technology can achieve the challenging technical targets specified in the FOA for a focused program, the agency believes that the technology can have significant impact on the agency’s missions. In an OPEN FOA, the burden of demonstrating potential impact lies solely upon the applicant, who must make the strongest possible case for why the proposed technology will matter – that it has the potential to change our energy future. To obtain a copy of the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) please go to the ARPA-E website at https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov. To apply to this FOA, Applicants must register with and submit application materials through ARPA-E eXCHANGE (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Registration.aspx). For detailed guidance on using ARPA-E eXCHANGE, please refer to the ARPA-E eXCHANGE User Guide (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Manuals.aspx). ARPA-E will not review or consider concept papers submitted through other means. For problems with ARPA-E eXCHANGE, email ExchangeHelp@hq.doe.gov (with FOA name and number in the subject line).Questions about this FOA? Check the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://arpa-e.energy.gov/faq. For questions that have not already been answered, email ARPA-E-CO@hq.doe.gov.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=331457
ECOSynBIO SBIR/STTR $3,677,642.00

ECOSynBio SBIR/STTRThis funding opportunity seeks submissions to establish new technologies to significantly improve the carbon efficiency of bioconversion platforms through the accommodation of external reducing equivalents. Proposed systems of interest include, but are not limited to: (1) carbon optimized fermentation strains that avoid CO2 evolution, (2) engineered mixotrophic consortia or systems that avoid CO2 evolution, (3) biomass or gas fermentation with internal CO2 utilization, (4) cell-free carbon optimized biocatalytic biomass conversion and/or CO2 utilization, and (5) cross-cutting or other proposed carbon optimized bioconversion schemes. All systems will need to demonstrate the capacity to accommodate external reducing equivalents to optimize the carbon efficiency of the system as compared to traditional fermentation systems (i.e. the sum of the recoverable energy contents of the products is greater than the energy content of the biomass or primary carbon feedstock). • To apply to this FOA, Applicants must register with and submit application materials through ARPA-E eXCHANGE (https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Registration.aspx). For detailed guidance on using ARPA-E eXCHANGE, see Section IV.H.1 of the FOA.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=329015
Energy and Carbon Optimized Synthesis for the Bioeconomy (ECOSynBio) $7,000,000.00

ECOSynBioThis funding opportunity seeks submissions to establish new technologies to significantly improve the carbon efficiency of bioconversion platforms through the accommodation of external reducing equivalents. Proposed systems of interest include, but are not limited to: (1) carbon optimized fermentation strains that avoid CO2 evolution, (2) engineered mixotrophic consortia or systems that avoid CO2 evolution, (3) biomass or gas fermentation with internal CO2 utilization, (4) cell-free carbon optimized biocatalytic biomass conversion and/or CO2 utilization, and (5) cross-cutting or other proposed carbon optimized bioconversion schemes. All systems will need to demonstrate the capacity to accommodate external reducing equivalents to optimize the carbon efficiency of the system as compared to traditional fermentation systems (i.e. the sum of the recoverable energy contents of the products is greater than the energy content of the biomass or primary carbon feedstock).

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=328993
Systems for Monitoring and Analytics for Renewable Transportation Fuels from Agricultural Resources and Management (SMARTFARM) $10,000,000.00

Systems for Monitoring and Analytics for Renewable Transportation Fuels from Agricultural Resources and Management (SMARTFARM) Agency Overview: The Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E), an organization within the Department of Energy (DOE), is chartered by Congress in the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-69), as amended by the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-358) to: “(A) to enhance the economic and energy security of the United States through the development of energy technologies that result in— (i) reductions of imports of energy from foreign sources; (ii) reductions of energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases; and (iii) improvement in the energy efficiency of all economic sectors; and (B) to ensure that the United States maintains a technological lead in developing and deploying advanced energy technologies.” ARPA-E issues this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) under the programmatic authorizing statute codified at 42 U.S.C. § 16538. The FOA and any awards made under this FOA are subject to 2 C.F.R. Part 200 as amended by 2 C.F.R. Part 910. ARPA-E funds research on and the development of high-potential, high-impact energy technologies that are too early for private-sector investment. The agency focuses on technologies that can be meaningfully advanced with a modest investment over a defined period of time in order to catalyze the translation from scientific discovery to early-stage technology. For the latest news and information about ARPA-E, its programs and the research projects currently supported, see: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/. Program Overview: U.S. agriculture has the potential to produce ~5 Quadrillion Btu of energy in the form of biofuels, and with new innovations throughout the biofuel supply chain, these fuels could become carbon negative. Reaching this potential and achieving greater carbon reductions requires that feedstock producers adopt new technologies and management practices that simultaneously improve yield, drive down production associated emissions, and enhance carbon sequestration in soils. To facilitate the adoption of these new technologies and practices for improved carbon management, feedstock producers need incentives beyond yield. While carbon management incentive structures exist elsewhere in the biofuel supply chain, they do not extend to feedstock production because monitoring and verification of feedstock production emissions is too costly to conduct at the field level. Instead, all feedstock producers are assumed to produce the same amount of emissions— the national average —despite significant variations in actual emissions when moving to state or regional averages, let alone field-level estimates. The objective of the Systems for Monitoring and Analytics for Renewable Transportation Fuels from Agricultural Resources and Management (SMARTFARM) program is to bridge the data gap in the biofuel supply chain by funding the development of technologies that can replace national averages and emissions factors for feedstock-related emissions with field-level estimates. The value of such technologies will be evaluated by their ability to reliably, accurately (i.e. low uncertainty), and cost-effectively quantify feedstock production lifecycle emissions (in g CO2e/acre) at the field level (i.e. scalable to >80 acres). If successful, the technologies funded by this phase of the SMARTFARM program will catalyze new market incentives for efficiency in feedstock production and carbon management, reducing annual U.S. emissions by ~1%, and with substantially greater potential emissions reductions implications if expanded to other agricultural products beyond biofuels.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=323151